1. Water over the dam

The expression “water over the dam” is an idiom we use to mean an event or set of events that have already happened and cannot be changed. 

Example: Can you forget it? It’s all water over the dam.

2. March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb

The expression “March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb” is an idiom we use to mean that March usually starts on a fierce cold weather and ends on a much gentler weather.

You can use the given expression in the situation like tragedy or an pandemic like Covid-19. Of course, people are frustrated with all that happening during this global disease. However, keep in mind, it has come come suddenly and spread fiercely, it will soon end because when something starts with a huge speed, it ends slowly.

Example:

Don’t worry about the affect of this disease! March comes like a lion and goes out like a lamb.

3. You have to be cruel to be kind

The expression “you have to be cruel to be kind” is an idiom we use when we must be blunt and honest with someone in order to help them realise something that may help them; it is sometimes necessary to say or do something to someone that seems unkind but is intended to help them.

Example:

Why are you not scolding your son for his mistakes? Don’t forget, you have to be cruel to be kind.

Also Read: Prepositional Phrases with ‘OUT’

4. The order of the day

The expression “the order of the day” is an idiom we use to express about something that is a priority in a certain situation or at a given time.

I’m sure you’ve heard it before that we should have a morning routine that puts us forward for a smooth day. That being the rule of thumb, what’s the order of the day for you? I personally like to keep it simple. The name of the game is peace and energy, that ring the changes on giving myself a moment of understanding and awakening before entering the zero hours of the day

5. Keep your shirt on

The expression ‘keep your shirt on‘ is an idiom we use to refer to stay calm, to be patient, to refrain from panicking or losing one’s temper.

Cool, calm and collected people have the strongest minds. A transcendent control over our temper can help us in umpteen ways. It would help us rejuvenate the passional relationships with others and we will be able to take better decisions all the time.

As educators, we are battle-scarred to keep calm and composed no matter what the situation holds. Keeping our shirt on is important because it gives a marvellous insight to the children and it teaches them that they too should keep their shirt on in any given situation life throws at them. Contrariwise, showing tension and anxiety to our children lays an adverse repercussion on them and it tells them that we’re not ready for the class. 

Making a long story short, setting up a positive classroom environment that the students enjoy is a matter of life and death. It takes nut and bolts and, trial-and errors but they are the only ways to have a favourable impact on the students and change their behaviour long term.

This might be useful: List of Phobias in English

6. Keep it 100

The expression “keep it 100” is an idiom to refer to keep yourself real and true, to be honest and stick to the way you are, no matter what anyone else thinks.

Keeping it 100 is open-and-shut; either you live in honesty or you live out of honesty. Makes sense? Yeah, that’s it. Just a five-finger exercise. Fair in or out. Merely black and white. No ifs or buts about it. No sweat at all.

7. As cool as a cucumber

The expression ‘as cool as a cucumber‘ is an idiom we use to refer to be at peace with the world.

Keeping it 100 is open-and-shut; either you live in honesty or you live out of honesty. Makes sense? Yeah, that’s it. Just a five-finger exercise. Fair in or out. Merely black and white. No ifs or buts about it. No sweat at all.

Example: She was furious, but her boyfriend was as cool as a cucumber.

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